Thursday, May 19, 2016

Types of Cats (Part 11)

LaPerm: The LaPerm looks as if he stuck his paw in a light socket and got a shock, but his curly coat is the result of a natural genetic mutation, not at all unusual in the world of cats. The LaPerm may be born bald or shorthaired, with his wavy or ringleted coat coming in at maturity. The coat comes in any color or pattern but is most often seen in tortoiseshell, tabby, or red. It may be short or long and covers the entire body, right down to the curly tail. Not all of the cats develop a curly coat, however. Some are born with a straight coat and keep it throughout their lives. If you want to be sure your LaPerm has curls, you may want to seek out one whose mature coat has already come in. This is a medium-size cat who weighs 5 to 10 pounds and reaches maturity at two to three years of age.
Nebelung: Nebelungs are mild, soft-spoken, and gentle. They are generally reserved around strangers, ranging from hiding-under-the-bed timid to warily eyeing intruders from a safe distance. Given humans' unpredictable behavior, this could be interpreted as a sign of extreme intelligence. To their family, Nebelungs are like Russian Blues, affectionate and playful although not intrusive. They tend to bond with a select few humans and stay loving and devoted throughout their lives. The primary difference in conformation between the Nebelung and the Russian Blue is coat length, otherwise, the standards are almost identical. Whereas the Russian Blue's coat is short and dense, the Nebelung's fur is medium-long, silky, and possesses a dense undercoat. The bright blue color is contrasted with silver-tipped guard hairs and therefore the coat catches the light, giving the fur a luminous, misty quality. Even with a dense undercoat that makes the coat stand away from the body, the fur resists matting and does well with a good once-a-week brushing.

Monday, May 16, 2016

Types of Cats (Part 10)

Cornish Rex: Cornish Rexes are good for folks who like having their lives run by active, inquisitive, gazelle-like felines that love a good joke, as long as it's not on them. Everything is a game to the Cornish Rex, and they can be hard to ignore when they're in a sociable mood, which is most of the time. Rexes are determinedly outgoing with their favorite humans. With their warm suede feel, they make the perfect winter lap warmer, too. They are intelligent, alert, and usually easy to handle. Extremely affectionate, Rexes are particularly so around dinnertime, so devoted, in fact, that you can't keep them out of your plate without a squirt bottle. Dinner will never be the same again with a purring Cornish stealing your food as soon as your back is turned, or even while you're looking. Some Rexes enjoy retrieving and will bring back objects for you to toss again and again. They are adept climbers, leapers, and sprinters, and have marvelously agile paws. No shelf or cupboard is safe from a persistent Cornish.

Cymric: The personality of the Cymric has won a strong following despite the breeding challenges. Cymrics are intelligent, fun-loving cats, and they get along well with other pets, including dogs. Cymrics are particularly noted for their loyalty to their humans and enjoy spending quality time with them. As cats go, they can be easily taught tricks. Despite their playful temperament, they are gentle and nonaggressive. Their playful yet tractable dispositions are good for families with children. Cymrics are powerful jumpers and if sufficiently motivated will manage to breach the most secure shelf. They are also fascinated by water, as long as you don't dunk them in the nasty stuff. Perhaps this fascination comes from originating on a small piece of land surrounded by it.

Types of Cats (Part 9)

Exotic Shorthair: Some folks who don't appreciate that laid-back, mellow personality label Persians and their relatives 'furniture with fur', but in truth Exotics are playful and enjoy a good game of catching the catnip mouse between bouts of catching a few ZZZs. Because of the American Shorthair influence, Exotics are reported to be livelier than Persians, although some breeders say that the two breeds are very similar in temperament. Undoubtedly, the Exotic personality is, if not identical, very much like the Persian's, quiet, loyal, sweet, and affectionate. They want to be involved in their favorite humans' lives and will quietly follow them from room to room just to see what they are doing. They also enjoy hugs and cuddles, and lavish their humans with purrs and licks of affection until the thick coat drives them away to lounge on cool kitchen linoleum or cold fireplace bricks. Fanciers point out that because of the short coat, they can spend more time playing with their Exotics than grooming them.

Balinese: Balinese cats are smart, sweet, and fun to be around. Like the Siamese, they are known for their ability to communicate vocally, sometimes nonstop, and therefore this breed is not for everyone. Highly social, Balinese are sensitive to your moods and feelings and are more than willing to cheer you up with some happy chatter if you're feeling gloomy. They are agile leapers and will often ride on their people's shoulders. They love to play and easily learn to fetch, bringing the ball or toy back for repeated throwing. They will keep you entertained with their antics, but possess a loving disposition as well. They can be quite assertive in their requests for attention, but also possess a special dignity particular to the Balinese and Siamese breeds.

Types of Cats (Part 8)

Abyssinian Cat: Abyssinians aren't for those who want decorative cats to match the rust-colored carpet, or for those who want cats that enjoy being picked up and cuddled. Courageous, curious, and high-spirited, when restrained Abys tend to become struggling bundles of fur with more than the usual number of elbows; however, that's not to say that Abyssinians are aloof or standoffish. While Abyssinians will cheerfully entertain themselves, they are most happy when involved in every aspect of your life. They are particularly involved at dinnertime. In fact, you'll know it's dinnertime when small, furry, food-seeking missiles attach themselves to your legs! Abyssinians regularly perform antics for your amusement, earning them the reputation of being the clowns of the cat kingdom. They will often perch on shoulders, crawl under covers, and sit on laps purring madly before racing off to bat imaginary butterflies and make flying leaps at the tallest bookcases. Natural athletes, no closed room or cupboard is safe from their agile paws and inquiring minds.


Sphynx Cat: According to the French breed standard, the Sphynx is part monkey, part dog, part child, and part cat. The breed does seem to possess some personality traits of each, despite what geneticists might say about such a combination. To say Sphynxes are lively is an understatement; they perform monkey-like aerialist feats from the top of doorways and bookshelves. Very devoted and loyal, they follow their humans around, wagging their tails doggy fashion and purring with affection. They demand your unconditional attention and are as mischievous (and lovable) as children. And despite all that and their alien appearance, they are completely cats, with all the mystery and charm that has fascinated humankind for thousands of years. While the Sphynx may not be for everyone, his unique appearance and charming temperament has won him an active, enthusiastic following.

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Types of Cats (Part 7)

Pixie-Bob: Big, lively and outgoing, the Pixie-bob’s devotion to his people belies his somewhat wild look. He loves spending time with his family, and it’s not unusual for him to learn to walk on a leash or chase after a toy and bring it back. He likes to be in the center of family goings-on, but he has a calm, relaxed attitude, making him more restful to be around than some other cat breeds. The Pixie-bob is talkative, chirping and chattering as he tells you about his day. The Pixie-bob is well suited to any home with people who will love him and care for him. Keep him indoors to protect him from cars, diseases spread by other cats and attacks from other animals.

Toyger: The lion may be the king of beasts, but the tiger is arguably the most majestic of the big cats. Sadly, tigers are highly endangered, and it seems as if little can be done to stop their slide toward extinction. But breeder Judy Sugden and other cat breeders who followed her lead hope that their creation—the Toyger—will help bring recognition to the tiger’s plight. As the muscular Toyger slinks through your living room, it would be easy to imagine that he is truly a tiger cub. A tiger cub that won’t grow up to eat you. The Toyger has a sweet, calm personality and is generally friendly. He’s outgoing enough to walk on a leash, energetic enough to play fetch and other interactive games, and confident enough to get along with other cats and friendly dogs. He can also be a good choice for families with children as long as their interactions are supervised. Toygers usually weigh seven to 15 pounds and live for 13 or more years.


Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Types of Cats (Part 6)

Singapura: The Singapura is a smaller than average, shorthaired cat with noticeably large eyes and ears. On first impression, you might think you were looking at some new color of Abyssinian. The pattern is nearly the same but on closer inspection you will note that the only other similarity is the large ears, everything else is different. The light beige coloring is unique and thought by some to be similar to cougars. The tail is normal length, the feet are very small, and the body is smaller, of a medium length and should be muscular. Eyes may be hazel, green or yellow but mature eye color is not predicable in kittens. Many veterinarians seeing a Singapura for the first time are apt to think something might be wrong with the kitten since it is so small. The Singapura is slow to develop and will not attain its full size until about 15 to 24 months of age. There isn’t much difference in size between mature males and females, females weighing approximately 5 to 6 pounds and males 6 to 8 pounds.

The Selkirk Rex is being developed as a large, heavy boned cat rather like the British Shorthair in conformation. The head is round with no flat planes. The curl is plush and loosely curled, showing up more dramatically on the longhair. Selkirks are healthy and sturdy. They are an incredibly patient, loving, and tolerant cats. From the moment of birth, curly kittens can be distinguished from their straight haired littermates by their curly whiskers. The whiskers are brittle and may break as they grow longer. The whiskers and hair do not change as the cat grows older; if they are curly at birth, they are curly as an adult. Even if the coat later shows less curl, the cat has the curly gene and retains the curly whiskers.

Types of Cats (Part 5)

Norwegian Forrest Cat: Known as the Skogkatt in its native Norway, the Norwegian Forest Cat is a large, semi-longhaired cat whose rugged appearance fits its name. Despite the hardy facade, this breed is very much a homebody that enjoys the company of other pets and particularly their human companions. Their relationship with you can best be described as “on their own terms.” Yes, Forest Cats can be lap cats, but THEY will decide when to get on or off that lap. At a minimum, Forest Cats insist on being near their people in a place of their choosing: chair, bed, or desktop. A scratching post and a cat tree, preferably tall, are musts for the Norwegian Forest Cat home. These are moderately active cats; there will be bursts of energy followed by long naps. Sensitive yet social, you will find them to be intelligent cats that adapt readily to change. Breeders are often asked if these cats need to be outside. As with all cats, inside the home is quite suitable and is certainly the safest environment. Providing interesting toys, perches with outside views, and most importantly, regular one-on-one time will result in a well-adjusted cat.

American Bobtail: American Bobtails are loving and incredibly intelligent cats possessing a distinctive wild appearance. They are extremely interactive cats that bond with their human family with great devotion. They can both entertain through their antics at one moment and provide their owners a warm, soft shoulder to cry on in times of distress. American Bobtails are known for their love of games and can play fetch or hide and seek for hours on end. They will often initiate games with their owners, and they demonstrate their hunting instincts in the home by catching in mid-air flying insects that make the fatal mistake of entering their territory. They also love to stalk their toys and carry them in their mouths, as if they were a freshly caught rodent. Basically a quiet cat, the American Bobtail is known to trill, chirp, and click when delighted. They are easily leash trained and love to go for walks with their people. An easygoing breed, they get along well with most dogs and welcome newcomers, whether they are two-legged or four-legged.

Types of Cats (Part 4)

British Shorthairs: Compared to most shorthair breeds, British Shorthairs are relatively calm cats when they mature. They are easygoing in nature and talk infrequently. Very affectionate, they become quite attached to the people they own. British Shorthairs are easily trained and very adaptable. They seem to get along well with all human members of the household, regardless of age, but are usually not fond of being carried. Pets of all kinds have been kept with British Shorthairs, including dogs of all sizes, rabbits, and birds. British Shorthairs are not known for being acrobats and can tend to be clumsy at times. No breed specific, health related problems plague the British Shorthair.

Ragdolls are large, laid-back, semi longhaired cats with captivating blue eyes. The Ragdoll is a pointed breed, which means that the body is lighter in color than the points (the face, legs, tail and ears). The Ragdoll cat is carefully bred to produce large affectionate animals in three patterns, two with white (mitted and bi-color) and one with no white (colorpoint). The ideal Ragdoll is a well balanced cat, with no extreme features. Altered males will usually top the scale at 15-20 pounds; females are proportionately smaller and usually weigh between 10-15 pounds at maturity. Ragdolls are slow-maturing, reaching full coat color at two years, and full size and weight at four.

Monday, March 28, 2016

Types of Cats (Part 3)

Egyptian Mau: Egyptian Maus are very independent cats even if they have been with he same owner since kitten hood. But even through their independent nature, Egyptian Maus are very comfortable around their families. They don't shed much fur but be prepared for a good amount of fur on your clothing. Maus, however, are more prone to genetic diseases because of poor breeding practices. Maus are a little on the playful side and love to vocalize their feelings to their families.
Maine Coon: If you are looking for a loving, family-friendly, goofy, playful, sweet, and loud cat, then the Maine Coon if the cat for you. They love to be around their families and don't ever let themselves be unheard. Coons have a beautiful thick coat that need a lot of attention and if left unkept, then you will pay the price with fur on every surface in your house. But the trademark of the Maine Coon has to be their tails. It is long, fluffy, and heavy and they just drag it along the floor behind them while they walk.

Friday, February 19, 2016

Types of Cats (Part 2)


American Shorthair: American Shorthair cats can best be described as a happy medium. They aren't too big or too small. They aren't too hyper or too laid back. If you enjoy a lovable cat but is also not in your face about it, then the American Shorthaired cat is the perfect cat for you. They can generally live from 15 to 20 years. More than 1/3 of American Shorthaired cats are the silver tabby with black markings.


Persian Cat: In a word, Persian cats can be described as placid. They are not hyper in any way possible and need to have their trust earned. But once you do, they crave your affection and love to be around you. However, owning a Persian cat is time consuming because their long coat requires a lot of grooming.


Russian Blue Cats: When a Russian Blue is around a stranger, they are gentle and reserved cats. But once they are around their families, they turn into energetic and playful companions. Russian Blues are energetic but not overly energetic. Even though they can have fun all by themselves, there is not a thing they love more than when their favorite human joins in on the fun. Russian Blues are polite and easily trained. A simple 'no' will do.